15 December, 2018

Customary Tenure Systems and REDD+: Ensuring Benefits for Indigenous Peoples

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This publication is a knowledge product arising from the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) Capacity Building on REDD+ for Forest-Dependent Indigenous Peoples in East Asia and the Pacific and South Asia Regions Project, with Tebtebba Foundation as the Recipient. The project aims to strengthen: (i) the knowledge of targeted forest-dependent indigenous peoples on REDD+ Readiness at the national level; and (ii) knowledge exchange at the regional level.

 

CONTENTS

Synthesis (by Wilfredo V. Alangui)


Fiji: Navigating a Dual Tenure System and REDD+ (by Akanisi Sobusobu Tarabe)

  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Study Design
  • The Context: Fiji
  • State Laws and Policies on Land and Forest Tenure Systems
  • International Laws and Implications on Rights of Indigenous Peoples
  • Experience with REDD+
  • Conclusions and Recommendations


Nepal: Customary Resource Management a Foundation for REDD+ (by Pasang Dolma Sherpa, Pasang Sherpa PhD, Arun Rai, Pemba Thile Sherpa)

  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • The Study
  • Indigenous Peoples and Concept of Customary Tenure
  • International Legal Framework
  • National Legal Policy Framework
  • Customary Tenure System and REDD+
  • REDD+ Institutional Structure from Central to Local Level
  • Customary Tenure Systems in Chitwan and Bardiya
  • Indigenous Women and Customary Tenure System
  • Indigenous Peoples and REDD+ Implementation
  • Assertion of Customary Tenure Rights through REDD+
  • Summary of Key Findings and Conclusion
  • Recommendations


Vietnam: Customary Tenure Rights and REDD+ Potential to Promote Legal Recognition (by James Israel Alim, Vu Thi Hien, Ho Thanh Thuy, Hoang My Lien)

  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Research Methodology
  • National Legal Framework on Land and Forest Administration
  • Laws and Policies Impacting Customary Tenure Systems
  • Customary Tenure Systems of Ethnic Groups in Thai Nguyen and Thanh Hoa
  • Ethnic Women and Customary Tenure System
  • Customary Tenure Systems and REDD+ Implementation
  • Summary of Key Findings
  • Recommendations

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Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Capacity Building on REDD+ for Forest-Dependent Indigenous Peoples

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IN EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC AND SOUTH ASIA REGIONS PROJECT

(P153585, FCPF Grant No. TF0A3570)

 

THIRD PROGRESS REPORT

30 June 2018

 

BACKGROUND

This Capacity Building Project (CBP) for forest-dependent indigenous peoples funded under Phase two of the Readiness Fund of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) and managed by the World Bank (WB) is being implemented from October 31, 2016 to October 31, 2018.
Its objective is to provide forest-dependent indigenous peoples with information, knowledge, and awareness on REDD+ to enhance their understanding on REDD+, and to enable them to engage more meaningfully in the implementation of REDD+ readiness activities. The aim is to support activities that empower and enable these stakeholder groups, to enhance and influence REDD+ development outcomes, and also to strengthen mechanisms for inclusion, accountability, and participation. It is being implemented through the WB’s “Procedures for Small Recipient-Executed Trust Fund Grants”.


PROJECT OBJECTIVES

The project development objective (PDO) is to strengthen: (i) the knowledge of targeted forest-dependent indigenous peoples on REDD+ Readiness at the national level and (ii) knowledge exchange at the regional level.


COUNTRIES OF IMPLEMENTATION

This project has a total budget of US$490,750. The project beneficiaries are forest-dependent IPs and their representative organizations and institutions in the ten FCPF eligible countries in Asia and the Pacific, namely Bhutan, Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Nepal, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Vanuatu and Vietnam which are eligible to participate in regional learning and exchange activities (Component 2). Of these ten countries, six (6) countries are eligible to participate in national-level activities (Component 1), namely Bhutan, Fiji, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and Vietnam.

 

Download full report here.

 

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Capacity Building on REDD+ for Forest-Dependent Indigenous Peoples

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IN EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC AND SOUTH ASIA REGIONS PROJECT

(P153585, FCPF Grant No. TF0A3570)

 

SECOND PROGRESS REPORT

31 December 2017

 

BACKGROUND

This Capacity Building Project (CBP) for forest-dependent indigenous peoples funded under Phase two of the Readiness Fund of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) and managed by the World Bank (WB) is being implemented from October 31, 2016 to October 31, 2018. 

Its objective is to provide forest-dependent indigenous peoples with information, knowledge, and awareness on REDD+ to enhance their understanding on REDD+, and to enable them to engage more meaningfully in the implementation of REDD+ readiness activities.  The aim is to support activities that empower and enable these stakeholder groups, to enhance and influence REDD+ development outcomes, and also to strengthen mechanisms for inclusion, accountability, and participation. It is being implemented through the WB’s “Procedures for Small Recipient-Executed Trust Fund Grants”. 

 

PROJECT OBJECTIVES

The project development objective (PDO) is to strengthen: (i) the knowledge of targeted forest-dependent indigenous peoples on REDD+ Readiness at the national level and (ii) knowledge exchange at the regional level. 

 

COUNTRIES OF IMPLEMENTATION

This project has a total budget of US$490,750.  The project beneficiaries are forest-dependent IPs and their representative ‎organizations and institutions in the ten FCPF eligible countries in Asia and the Pacific‎, ‎namely Bhutan, Cambodia, Fiji, ‎Indonesia, ‎Nepal, Pakistan, ‎Papua ‎New ‎Guinea, Thailand, ‎Vanuatu and Vietnam which are eligible to participate ‎in regional learning and exchange activities (Component 2). Of these ‎ten countries, six (6) countries are eligible to ‎participate in national-level activities (Component 1), namely Bhutan, Fiji, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and Vietnam. 

 

Download full report here.

 

Vanuatu Foresters Association (VFA) Approved Proposal

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Forest Carbon Partnership Facility-Capacity Building on REDD+ for Forest-Dependent Indigenous Peoples in East Asia and the Pacific (EAP) and South Asia Region (SAR) Project (FCPF-CBP)

 
Sub-Project Title: Building the capacity of the Vanuatu indigenous forests dependent population to be aware of REDD+ and how they could adjust their socio-economic activities in order to enhance the carbon stocks and simultaneously adapt to impacts of climate change.
 
Vanuatu is a Y-shaped archipelago which lies in the western Pacific Ocean in the middle of a triangle formed by the Solomon Islands, New Caledonia and Fiji. The archipelago stretches approximately 1,400 km from north to south between the latitudes of 13 and 21° S and longitudes of 166 and 172° E and comprises more than 80 islands, 67 of which are inhabited, and 12 of which are considered major in terms of land area. The islands are of volcanic origin along with coral atolls.
 
Vanuatu’s total land area is about 12,190 km of which 36% has forest cover (>10m tree height), 43% is lower woody and mangrove vegetation and 21% in other land uses. The Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) covers an estimated area of 680,000 km2 and the country shares maritime borders with New Caledonia, the Solomon Islands, and Fiji.
 
The Vanuatu constitution states that all land and resources on the land belongs to the indigenous custom owners and their descendants and custom rules are the basis for the ownership and use of land and resources on that land. The landowners have the sole ownership of their land and are in the first place responsible for management decisions. Land cannot be alienated, but can be leased from the landholders for fixed periods and for agreed purposes. In the field natural features such as creeks and ridges normally mark traditional land boundaries of the various clan lots. Indigenous people are inseparable from their land as it provides them their basic needs such as water, food, shelter, fuel
wood, building materials as well as commercial benefits derived from sale of forest products. Most parts of Vanuatu land is inherited through patrilineal system but there are few areas that used matrilineal.
 
Vanuatu is one of the 57 so called small island developing states (SIDS) recognizes by the United Nations that the tropical islands are at risk of being severely affected by the current and anticipated impacts of climate variability and change, including both extreme events and gradual environmental changes. Already Vanuatu is struggling with the environmental problems such as land degradation, biodiversity losses, and coastal and marine pollution caused, inter alia, by population growth and urbanization as in addition to the common development challenges such as smallness, remoteness, and proneness to natural disasters.
 
 

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Capacity Building on REDD+ for Forest-Dependent Indigenous Peoples

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IN EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC AND SOUTH ASIA REGIONS PROJECT

(P153585, FCPF Grant No. TF0A3570)

 

FIRST PROGRESS REPORT

June 30, 2017

BACKGROUND

This Capacity Building Project (CBP) is being funded under Phase two of the Readiness Fund of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) being managed by the World Bank (WB).  The CBP has two components, one for forest-dependent indigenous peoples and another for Southern Civil Society Organizations and Local Communities.  Its objective is to provide forest-dependent indigenous peoples, and Southern CSOs and local communities with information, knowledge, and awareness on REDD+ to enhance their understanding on REDD+, and to enable them to engage more meaningfully in the implementation of REDD+ readiness activities.  The aim is to support activities that empower and enable these stakeholder groups, to enhance and influence REDD+ development outcomes, and also to strengthen mechanisms for inclusion, accountability, and participation. It is being implemented through the WB’s “Procedures for Small Recipient-Executed Trust Fund Grants”. 

Tebtebba Foundation (Indigenous Peoples’ International Centre for Policy Research and Education) was chosen as the Recipient for the East Asia-Pacific and South Asia region. The project beneficiaries are forest-dependent IPs and their representative ‎organizations and institutions in the ten FCPF eligible countries in Asia and the Pacific‎, ‎namely Bhutan, Cambodia, Fiji, ‎Indonesia, ‎Nepal, Pakistan, ‎Papua ‎New ‎Guinea, Thailand, ‎Vanuatu and Vietnam which are eligible to participate ‎in regional learning and exchange activities (Component 2). Of these ‎ten countries, six (6) countries are eligible to ‎participate in national-level activities (Component 1), namely Bhutan, Fiji, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and Vietnam. This is the first progress report prepared for the project, covering the period of project effectiveness (October 31, 2016) to June 30, 2017.

 

PROJECT OBJECTIVES

The project development objective (PDO) is to strengthen: (i) the knowledge of targeted forest-dependent indigenous peoples on REDD+ Readiness at the national level and (ii) knowledge exchange at the regional level. 

 

COUNTRIES OF IMPLEMENTATION

This project with a total budget of US$490,750 is being implemented in FCPF countries in East Asia, the Pacific and South Asia Regions, which are Bhutan, Cambodia, Fiji, Indonesia, Nepal, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Vanuatu and Vietnam. Of these countries, only six (6) are eligible for funding support under Component 1 (national level capacity building), namely: Bhutan, Fiji, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and Vietnam following eligibility criteria as detailed in the Operational Manual (OM).

 

Download full report here.

 

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